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of a restructuring in our economy and in our workforce. if we were to go back to boom times with respect to growth and gdp and employment that would be people getting back into the same jobs that were ruined or lost in the bubble and i think it is good that is not happening. i think we're seeing more diligent capital allocation. people are learning new skills, restraining themselves to be better quipped to be productive in a digital economy. i think that means slowness in the near term but long term i believe the country will be stronger than ever. i think when it comes for investing, investors have to be diligent. it will not be a an easy kal call when market going straight up easy call when the market is going straight down. tough do your homework. david: the phrase of the day isp capital allocation. we're all expecting apple to do something with the $137 billion whether pay out a bigger dividend over 3% or stock buybacks or something like that. isn't there an endgame here that hasn't been looked at by a lot of investors to jump on the news of increased dividend? that is to say if you're not inv
for the sequester, which is currently having and will have a very, very negative effect on our economy, on jobs, and on the confidence that americans have that we are pursuing rational policy. the the gentleman and i both have agreed that sequester is not a rational policy. it deals with high priority and low priority items in very much the same way. so my question, mr. leader, is there a possibility, not on the calendar, you didn't announc it, bui w you that we go to conference, preferably, the first day we are back, after this weekend, so that we could get to work on trying to get to an agreement on one of the most pressing problems in front of this country, and that's getting ourselves on a fiscally sustainable path. i yield to my friend. mr. cantor: i thank the gentleman. i appreciate the spirit with which he recommends that we proceed along the lines of those individuals that he spoke about had asked for. and i would say to the gentleman, mr. speaker, that i'm told that our chairman and the chairman on the other side of the capitol, ms. murry, they are meeting and looking to see the path f
% of poll, only americans think that control is an important problem mostly economy in general, 24% think that is most important. federal budget deficit and federal debt is 11%. here is the front page of "the new york daily news," -- lindsay is an independent here in washington d.c.. you are on "washington journal." am really sad and i want to make sure if one does in this country that 31,000 people per year are killed by guns. this is a normal and we did this is a horrible number for its allies civilization. horrible number for a civilization. stronger gun laws can make a difference. calling in.you for this is the front page of " the washington times." michael is from rockville center, new york. caller: the reason this legislation failed is not only would it have not prevented the terrible tragedy that occurred in connecticut but also the tragedy in colorado. abroad is lacking because it would appear both parties have used this issue to raise money and at the same time not really address it responsibly. i think most americans are on to the fact that would appear you bringin -- that what
work hard planed by the rules. increasing minimum wage to $130eu an huer will also help the economy, will increase g.d.p. by more than $30 billion over the course of three years, as workers spend their raises in local businesses. opponents to increasing the minimum wage love to say that people won't hire, it will cost jobs. it's actually the opposite of that. this economic activity created by more spending in communities as a result of more money in minimum-wage earners' pockets would generate 140,000 new jobs. that's why business owners support raisings the minimum wage. the owners of brothers printing in cleveland pay workers more than the minimum wage. it means they have less turnover, it means their workers have a better standard of living. it helps the community. they do this because it is the right thing to do. it helps them keep their best trengthens their businesses and our economy. plain and simple, mr. president, ensuring ar we is good f amica's it's good for america's economy. i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call
here. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. [ beeping ] ♪ [ male announcer ] we don't just certify our pre-owned vehicles. we inspect, analyze and recondition each one, until it's nothing short of a genuine certified pre-owned... mercedes-benz for the next new owner. ♪ hurry in to your authorized mercedes-benz dealer for 1.99% financing during our certified pre-owned sales event through april 30th. very logical thinker. (laughs) i'm telling you right now, the girl back at home would absolutely not have taken a zip line in the jungle. (screams) i'm really glad that girl stayed at home. vo: expedia helps 30 million travelers a month find what they're looking for. one traveler at a time. expedia. find yours. [ dog ] you know, i just don't think i should have to wait for it! who do you think i am, quicken loans? ♪ at quicken loans, we won't make you wait for it. our efficient, online system allows us to get you through your home loan process fast. which means you'll never have to beg for a quick closi
-income and minority communities with the green economy. >> there's a lot that can happen in terms of real community level action. we're working with communities on how they kim mement some of the models that we talked about. trinity anglican sessioning from fossil fuel energy, moving to zero waste type of models. adapting local food movement and local food economies, all of these different ways but then also to influence the policies that are going to help to good afternoon and to make sure that we do have the type, the standard of living that we have from having air that's free of toxins and also reducing the impact of these pollutions on driving climate change. >> so avis jones deweever is there something such as environmental racism or environmental just snis. >> of course there is. any time you find that in every city in this nation, african-americans are much more likely than whites to live if areas where there are high concentrations of air toxins, i don't think there can be anything but that. >> justices about right relationships among people and what the world around us so yes, it includes
. jennifer nelson began working with me four years ago and through some downturns in the economy ended up having to leave and take a different job, was making pretty darn good money. and a year ago december jennifer approached me and said, i hate my job. she says, but i loved the nonprofit. so, jennifer. [laughter] >> please come up. (applause) >> this wouldedthctionv have happened without her. and phoenix is going to be 2013 or 2014 graffiti international. thank you, graffiti fighters. (applause) >> it's cocktail time. [laughter] ... (music) >> herb theatre,open rehearsal. listen to the rehearsal. i think it is fun for them, they see our work process, our discussions, the decisions we make. it is good for us. we kind of behavior little bit when we have people in the audience. msk (music) >> we are rehearsing for our most expensive tour; plus two concerts here. we are proud that the growth of the orchestra, and how it is expanded and it is being accepted. my ambition when i came on as music director here -- it was evident we needed absolutely excellent work. also evident to me that i tho
'd make them himself. and in the process, he stoked the artisan economy supporting not only his business but also reviving and supporting two other small businesses along the way. george grew up working in his family's suburban chicago cobbler shop. there he watched and learned the old world craft of repairing and rebuilding shoes from his father, john, an immigrant from greece. >> the first time my dad ever brought me to the shoe repair, he said by the end of the day you have to haveipolished. and at the time i didn't know what he was trying to do. scare me. he didn't want me to go into the shoe business. >> kids get dirty, you know, and it's nice. >> after college george start add career as a teacher, but soon found himself daydreaming about being his own boss and going into the shoe business just like his dad. >> growing up, you know, in my family you always had to buy shoes that could be resoled, shoes that would last. >> george realized where things are disposable, a well made pair of american shoes was hard to come by. >> i went to nordstrom's, to barney's. i went everywhere and it
? on beating crugs, improving the economy? -- on beating corruption, improving the economy? >> it seems like it. the colorado party was known for it there is a bit of an image problem. he is a business person. even though he's part of the colorado party, he's new to it. and he really comes from the outside. they think perhaps that he has as good of a chance as any to make good these promises against corruption, more transparency, more inclusiveness, an attack on poverty all of the things that in latin america today are on the tips of people's tongues. many thanks for joining us, eric. >> tharpgs for having me. >> polls in the ivory coast where people have been voting to elect hundreds of mayors and local counselors. it is the first major vote since thousands of people were illed three years ago. >> the last time asar decided to vote, that was when the presidential election was disputed. but it hasn't put him off voting for a new mayor and local counselors where he lives in the neighborhood of abajon. >> i am very relaxed. and i am at peace and i'm going to vote for my candidate. >> there are ne
control system contributes $1.3 trillion to the economy. if you shut that down you are crippling the economy. we move 810 million passengers a year, about 137,000 operations a day. if we shut that down, that's going to be an economic catastrophe. >> host: gautham nagesh of cq roll call. >> guest: thank you. if you could speak to the nature of the air traffic control system being antiquated so that brings up to question. the preib digital reduce the risk of a catastrophic attack like rerouting a train and as you transition to next-generation system will that increase the risk imposed by the cyberthreats? >> guest: that's an interesting question. the older systems, the less get the highest of the types are different as you know. as we modernize the system we are increasing the ability to enter into the system. in the old days before we were worried about cybersecurity and cyberattacks the faa was considered the air traffic system itself a closed system. nobody could get in and it was pretty much that way. now as we expand the system we have more people introducing things into the s
turn in the economy. i think that this project with the amount of square footage and the development of the whole water front is key to the survival of the programs that are here in san francisco. and also, to have a project like this, just steps away from the dog patch and also from south of market, and to be able to stroll from the ballpark right across the street and be able to enjoy the parks that are in this development. i would encourage you to support this project and the building trades are in full support of this, thank you very much. >> next speaker. >> good evening, supervisors, thank you, for your diligence today. this is an exciting project and going to be a great economic boost to the local economy, at presizely the time that we need it. i think that right now we are witnessing a backlog of projects that did not go forward in the worst years of the recession and hidden in the streets and we will need this to sustain our emergence from that recession. what could be more appropriate than our local teams whose players are our kids heroes creating job opportunities for par
strengthening our borders and our economy when i see you next, kyla campbell, ktvu channel 2 morning news. >>> they are talking about the battery system used in boeing dreamliner jets. the national safety board wants to know how it went unnoticed but the problem grounded those jets three months ago. they approved a redesign system and they are reinstalling those which had been in operation around the world. >>> we are also hearing the first reports of flight delays because of those furloughs and it is part of the budget sequester cuts. and up to 3 -- there are up to 3 hour delays in los angeles, but he many must take one unpaid day. we found out san francisco has 38 traffic controllers and 38 will be furloughed daily. there are 18 traffic controller at san jose's airport and two or three of them will be furloughed as many as every day. >> sal? >>> right now we are looking at a pretty good commute and we will be starting with interstate 880 and oakland and you can see it is definitely getting more crowded and this is the time when more people are getting on the road and if you are driving
things you need to consider. and whereas the economy appears to be out of the great recession, now in capital letters in the media, i know that all of our cities and agencies are holding tight. they don't want to get anywhere near that financial cliff again. and, so, your work controlling this budget is very important to them. i think one of the things that we have collectively fallen into a deli yum about is the fact there are so many zeroes on these numbers. ~ so, $50 million seems like [snap]. that's how much we save by financing, $350 million. so, it adds up, as they say. so, your continued attention to that will be important. speeding down the celeste -- one of our recommendation is any remaining contingencies be put under the command control of the program manager so that that can be reported to you and be visible and it doesn't really change the nature of your contingency management plan, but we think at this stage of the project it would be an appropriate idea. and then lastly, the impact of these projects and the importance of them. one of the points highlighted was the si
are beginning to ripple throughout the government and economy. most visible was air travel delays. timing of the effort is unclear it and faces long odds. republicans will oppose the move saying the savings were never intended to be spent in the first place. two other senators urging the obama administration to post own furloughs for air traffic controllers. kansas republican say the cuts are hurting the economy. lawmakers want furloughs postponed to give time to find a remedy. air traffic control cut backs are facing delays nationwide. >> pressure building on a district attorney to resign in texas because she was found drunk driving. the video shows her losing her balance, and failing several times to try to walk a straight line. she pleaded guilty and is serving a 45 day jail term but the 63-year-old two determine d.a.says she has no plans to quit. >> a ground breaking today, the school located on summit drive. as city leaders came out to celebrate, some are not happy bit. abc 7 news has the story. a ground breaking for the newest school in burlingame in 50 years. declining enrollment f
underpinning for the economy, we think the gold position is largely unnecessary in portfolios. >> why japan specifically? >> these actions are rather radical. that means that japanese insurers will have to -- and other financial institutionless have to seek out risk estates, then in terms of bonds globally. and so basically what we're see is the anticipation of that in the market so far. what we expect is a very significant increase in the nikkei, a significant decrease in the value of the yen, and a lot of assets moving from japan overseas. >> yet if you look at the chart of the nikkei that we just had up over a one-year period of time, it's already up over 37%. does it need to take a break? >> the bank of japan is setting new starting points and it has performed extraordinarily well. we think it has another significant leg up. remember the large institutions will be japanese moving from japanese institutions moving from fixed income in a by way, and we think the overseas money will follow as well. how would you play it and how are some of your clinds playing it? >> it's sore of counter in
in a far quicker way to satisfy the needs of a modern economy but the big thing government has to do is stop spending money on things that don't matter. this matters. innovation matters don't do things that a clematis -- commodities vegas investment changes the game. liz: and the stock is up year over year but we watch this closely and oracle of the competitor up 11% so you are doing better. the closing bell rings in 70 minutes. talk about a splash, see world jumps more than 25 percent of the stock market debut. yes they launched the ipo date to doubt the negative news flow and went for a. entertainment joins us next so why was now the good time to go public?@ and as we told you the developing news this hour the boston red sox game against kansas city royals cancelled tonight. you are looking at a live shot of a very empty fenway park just a few miles away from a massive manhunt in watertown and cambridge and will remain empty tonight. no game and the bruins hockey game also canceled for all the developments on fox business. dow jones industrial average up 14 points. 've known? we ga
on "starting point." ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. i work for 47 different companies. well, technically i work for one. that company, the united states postal service® works for thousands of home businesses. because at usps.com® you can pay, print and have your packages picked up for free. i can even drop off free boxes. i wear a lot of hats. well, technically i wear one. the u.s. postal service®, no business too small. >>> welcome back to "starting point," "minding your business" this morning. stock futures pointing to higher open. it would be a rebound from big losses last week. dow up and opens for real in two hours. $333 million. that's one estimate of how much it cost to shut down boston for the die. the area produces $325 billion worth of goods and services every year. that's a little less than a billion dollars a day. the ninth largest gdp in the country and friday everything stopped. businesses, public transit, colleges, shopping centers shut. now many people were at home. but others could
the economy grow and create jobs, protect the middle class, and protect seen yours. the president is engaged in a process with lawmakers where he's trying to find commonground to see if commonground exists with republicans around the basic principle to reduce the budget in a balanced way, and he's put forward a plan that would do that eliminating the sequester in the process. when it comes to delays, though, congress has to act in order to avert delays. >> prioritizing spending under the faa, but you want the sequester to inflict maximum -- >> since we did everything we could to avert the sequester, and, unfortunately, the republicans decided as a political matter it was a home run for them to inflick this upon the american people, i think that suggestion just doesn't hold water. secondly, the faa did take action, all the action it could under the law to produce savings and avoid furloughs up until this point where because of the nature of their budget and the personnel heavy nature of their operation furloughs are the only option available to the faa at this time. again, if congress wants t
economy work and define those things that are going to lead our country forward. it is a privilege to be here with you talking about ideas from the working families flexibility act that you are working hard on and i'm a proud co-sponsor but also ways we are going to find solutions for people across this country who are raising families, trying to pay for college trying to pay the energy bill for the month. mr. gardner: we have an incredible opportunity to get government out of the way and let america work, to unleash the entrepreneurs around this great nation over the past several months over the past couple of years, we have held dozens of town meetings, whether they are in southeastern colorado, northeastern colorado, the denver metro area, the new parts of my district, talking to families, talking to people who are struggling to make ends meet. people who have had to pick up a second job just to pay the bills. and as we talk tonight about making life work and i believe #makinglifework and i would like to hear from people around the country how we an help be a part of these solut
will go. and sometimes invest in a place where the economy is not where it would support necessarily a market solution, which is why a.i.d. has to be there. so you've got the millennium challenge corporation over here, a.i.d. as the preponderance of our expenditure, but it has adopted significant reforms in the last years that have actually movement some of the development challenge kinds of enterprize into a.i.d. wherever we can we are trying to do economic-based aid in a local way that is sustainable. and that will result in long-term gains, not a project that comes, and when the project's over the money's gone and there is nothing to show for it. but there are someplaces where you still have humanitarian demands and other demands that will not lend themselves to that, and we just need to understand that. we have to understand that's for the minimum -- minimalist fraction of the percentage of our aid that may represent, it's still an expression of our values and interest and it's important. now we are -- i'm not going to sit here and tell this committee that the job is done. we are
. indeed, our affordable universal service is crucial to the american economy and to american businesses that generate 95% of all mail. my written testimony offers a comprehensive set of options to restore the postal service to solvency. this morning i will cover, this afternoon i will cover the issues you specifically asked me to address in your invitation. on cost savings, the nalc and the other postal unions have contributed billions in savings through collective bargaining. that process concluded for just 12 weeks ago. the new nalc contract emerged from interest arbitration that focused on the financial condition of the postal service that led to award if you want to provide postal service with huge savings in the years to come. as we did during the great recession when we worked tirelessly with management to adjust routes to respond to mail voe' done, more must be done and congresseeds to do its part as well. i will highlight two cost reforms from the written testimony. first congress should repeal or dramatically reduce the retiree health prefunding mandate that caused over 80% of
. it begins to affect the economies in the area. certainly within the district i represent. yet there's always a persistent demand for more. the persistent demand usually comes from washington and not the border communities that they want more. some of those communities are the safest in the country. but the fact remains that if we are going to make security the linchpin and put dollars on top of dollars, taxpayer money, and there's a lack of transparency and oversight, i am not sure that this is not just become another symbolic gesture and the outcome continues to be one that is in doubt and people keep demanding more. host: for yourself representing a border state, as co-chairman of the progressive caucus, if any legislation that comes to be in the house and senate include border security as the linchpin to a pathway to citizenship, the border has to be secure before the 11 million people can get on a pathway to citizenship, if that's the case, are you a yes vote? guest: no. arbitrary triggers should not be part of the legislation. it's my understanding that there been a time of three years
dangers within our economy. one would be interest rates rising. i asked this to people i consider to be smart, big bankers, nature capital centers of the world. can they control just raising keep interest rates below? is there a point at which the central cannot keep pace. interest rate to 7% are when i was a kid, 19% were 21% would be catastrophic with this burden of debt. he seems to work right now, but there is a certain allusion of wealth in the stock market and evolution of the peace we can manage our debt. those are my concerns and because of that, we have to do long-range things. i propose several things since i've come. i propose fixing a security problem. to me it's an actuarial problem. you raise the age gradually 27862 thirds of the social security deficit. fix the remaining by testing the benefits. the president has occasionally sad he's for entitlement reform, but is not shown much leadership on this premise seems to benchmark per se, but any with him at least a 47 republican senators, we sat around a table that he and the vice president a year and half ago and i told
result. also what i liked is some of the bright spots that we see in an otherwise challenged economy. namely, the recovery of housing, particularly in our big housing states of california and florida. this has put an underpinning under consumer confidence and we see the preassumption of home construction, the energy situation in texas is very strong, lead to go an increase in pickup truck sales for us of plus 18%. we also had significant acquisitions in the quarter. in both phoenix and dallas, revenue run rate of 250 million, which when combined with last quarter is now over 800 million of acquisitions within the last six months and is, finally, and last but not leaf least, we've branded 0% of the company now under the flag of auto nation and the branded markets, even though we walked away from some names that were 80 years old, improved share right out of the box. >> that's what i was thinking, you know, wayne has been trying to get you to do that for a while and you finally listen to him and then you get the best quarter ever. >> yeah, you know, i should always listen to wayne soon
consumers, and back into the economy. earlier this year the cfpb finalized rules to strengthen mortgage standards. this includes the ability to -- the provision which requires lenders to make a good-faith effort to determine if the borrower can make his or her payments. this have been generally well-received by consumer and industry groups alike and i applaud the care the cfpb undertook in writing this rule. however, we must ensure that these rules do not have adverse impact on -- including rural areas. i look forward to hearing from director cordray on how this rule will impact rural lehning, which is an important issue in south dakota. finally, director cordray, your comments about reducing regulatory burden on community banks and credit unions. continue to be interested in your plans to make sure that we strike the right balance addressing consumers and addressing concerns smiler institutions may have. you have proven day in and day out that you are well-qualified for the position. even any colleagues across the aisle concede this point. i hope we can provide the market the certainty
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: 27 runners and thousands more spectators had turned out for the boston marathon today when terror erupted. two bombs exploded, and authorities said two people were killed and more than 50 others were wounded. (sirens). within minutes of the blast, wheelchairs and stretchers were ferrying victims up and down boylston street, the home stretch of the oldest marathon race in the world. amid the chaos competitors, race volunteers and spectators ran from the scene in shock. >> i went over there. there were body parts. people were blown apart. they're dead. where the wind owe is, the windows were all blown out. >> ifill: the attack came about thr
and when your biggest trading partner has a no-growth philosophy and paralyzing its own economy, you are not doing a lot of business with ta partner, and the proximate cause for the weakness here in the united states was the shell lacking in gold and the worst decline since 198 1980, and what we look at the etf falling 8% in a single day and now gold futures tumbling 15% in two days, and that is ri markable. and what caused that go down hideously? and gold and wheat causing all of the commodities to plummet, and oil did drop a little bit more than $2 after being down badly last week, i could say, yes, to that. i could say, yes, gold is that powerful and crush all sorts of assets in the declining wake, but it isn't. i could easily tell you, of course, that the slowing in china caused gold, copper, aluminum and other stocks the decline. it didn't. it would be an excuse that would fit the picture, but mystify you even more and really be nothing more than attempt by me to put the irrational in the rational box and then wrap a bow on it. think about it. china is terrible all year and noth
economy have suddenly acquired this enormous interest in what we thought fifty years ago was -- [inaudible] there are many reasons. one is the arctic sea ice. we will see in the near future, i emphasize the near future, opening up both new shipping routes. linking asia to america and europe in the same way as the suez canal did in its time. one of the reasons why the leadership of china has shown interest in the arctic, they are already planning for a world where china will be the preimminent trading country in the world. and if they send their ships through the northern routes to europe and asia, the distance will be short end by more than 40%. china is already building ships for this purpose. they are already formulating plans indicating the number of vessels that will, in this decade, sail through this route. singapore has already gotten -- [inaudible] with the primary mission of finding a location for a big singapore hopper somewhere until the arctic region. so like the suez canal, indicated are trading transformation of the 20th century. the opening of the northern sea route will indi
growing economy. and it was at risk. the private sector was at risk. the confidence of the american people, because people were stealing their identities, their accounts, their intellectual property and subsequent to that, their jobs, began to question the value of getting on the internet and using it for commercial purposes. their trust in the free and open internet the way we've embraced it in the internet really was at risk. how do we solve that problem? we knew that nation states were investing millions and billions of dollars to generate cyberwarriors that could go in and crack your computer network. i don't care if you had intellectual property, those blueprints that made your business successful or maybe it was your bank account or your ability to have a transaction. if they could interrupt that they could do great harm to the economy and to the united states. and we saw nation states like russia and china and now iran and north korea and others developing military-style attack to actually do harm to the u.s. economy, to hurt the very men and women who get up every day and play by t
provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, sony pictures classics, now presenting "the company you keep," union bank, and fidelity investments. >> this is what a personal economy looks like. as life changes, fidelity can help you readjust your investments along the w
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, united healthcare, , and fidelity investments. what a personal economy looks like. and as lifehangfidelity can help you readjust your investments along the way. refocus as careers change and kids and head off to college. and rebuild your plan. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you refine your
enough to sell into somebody's lower income economies. they're never going to be the lowest price people, that's not in their d.n.a. but they may have to do something a little bit less expensive. >> rose: back to the point that i think technology is so interesting today. one as i just said is underdeveloped countries and it gives them the opportunity to leap ahead and do things. two is education. >> absolutely. >> rose: it's what the possibilities are. how you can educate. where you can get degrees and you can sit in india and take courses at harvard. >> right. >> yes. >> there's a lock going on. the university that larry summers is involved in. it was a whole university. >> and three which you just mentioned is health care. the possibilities of being able to understand and diagnose and tting accesso infmati. >> there's diabetes apps, heart apps. >> three there's a thing you can put on there which is a glucose meter like kara was saying which of course, die s diabetics have to measure their glucose now instead of being having a glucose meter. it's not just a computer, it can transmit it
weaker economies. and when you get the imf admitting that austerity isn't the way, and i don't disagree. if you didn't do reforms and you didn't do pro growth, all three ingredients needed to make a growth economic cake, i shudder to think what happens next. many suspect moody's may downgrade spain. >> with all of that said, stephen, how do you want to allocate capital right here? >> i think you need to look into equities. it's very interesting. look at the 1,000 and 2,000, large and small cap space, but also defensive versus dynamic, the rally we've seen has been very strong. it's had this very defensive tam boar tambor. it's like this sub tub city -- city constitution effect. global economics, look at the u.s. first. name by name basis. emerging markets. i would think global bonds. longer term investors, commodities from a valuations perspective look attractive. >> commodities? gold? >> not necessarily gold. >> oil? >> dr. copper. the valuations are beginning to pull in a little bit if you've got three to five years which maybe a lot f of people don't have. if you're a longer investor
's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the chechen-american teenager accused in the boston marathon bombings now faces a possible death sentence. the filing of charges today officially moved the case into the federal courts, even as the city began returning to normal. dzhokhar tsarnaev was arraigned this morning, at boston's beth israel deaconess hospital, where he remained in serious condition. a short time later came word of the complaint, filed by the u.s. justice department. it formally charged the 19-year- old with conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction, potentially, a capital crime,
: in a rapidly growing economy, daughters have become an increasing financial liability for their families says this sociologist. >> that don't want to pay dowries, they want to receive dowries. they want to give more education to the boys than to the girls because for them the boys are still more important. >> reporter: and the census shows indians are acting on that bias. for every 1,000 male infants born, there are just 914 females. in some regions, far fewer. in nature, those numbers are about equal. >> the gap began to wideen in the '90s with new ultrasound machines that made it easy to learn the fetus' sex. the scan led to the termination of millions of female pregnancies. in delhi, the center for social research has organized women into neighborhood groups trying to shift the ingrained gender bias, even invoking hinduism's goddess of prosperity. >> ( translated ): we must begin to welcome girl babies into our homes, like the goddess lack shi has come into our home. lack smi. >> reporter: they're also aware of the law that's become known by its english acronym. that's the pre-conception a
something horrible to happen, or you need a total collapse of the economy. i don't see either. >> well, we're actually talking about two different events. relative to a correction this year, i think that we're looking at something similar to 2011. 10 to 20% off in the second or third quarter, kind of a reaction to this building uncertainty, this volatility we have seen since february. in terms of the bigger crash call that i've been making for more than a year now, as the s&p continues to top out very similar as it did in 2000 to 2007, i think you're right. i think that we are looking at some kind of external shock situation. >> no, no, i'm not -- i'm saying that's what you need to make your forecast right. i'm not predicting that. i don't see the end of the world scenario. i don't buy it. >> and i hope that bernanke -- >> gold signal. i just don't buy it. and so much liquidity -- seema, are you hearing this end of the world -- all right. let's take abigail. 10 to 20% correction. are you hearing that? >> if the fed pulls back on monetary support sooner than expected, i think there are trad
are characterizing this as a real threat to kill people, hurt economy.and a threat to the you know, they are cautious in saying that this was an imminent threat but it was not an aimminent but no less a very real threat. what's interesting here, jake, is they refused to release any information regard the search warrants. i tell you they have a good handful of plots under surveillance right now, and i've been briefed on a few of them. what they do is they continue from the very instant they seize on communication or anything that is suspicious, they then start to try and gain the authority to be able to bug their mobile phones, bug their homes, do whatever they need to do to keep the public safe. it seems to be what's happened at this point in time. they still say that the searches -- that the execution of those search warrants is ongoing, which is key what they find there. will they find explosives, the beginnings of a bomb, or will they find more stuff on computer hard drives, phone calls in question, things like that which would make the plot more aspirational. the other thing is, jake, they said t
because the economy isn't supporting that. what do you do? how do you respond to that? how do you protect your money? >> well the thing is you have to understand, actually mark hit on a great point, since 2009 revenues only grown by about 7% of the earnings have grown by almost 230%. the disparity's come from things like stock buybacks, accounting gimmickry in terms when do we account for stuff and when we don't. and so what drives corporate growth in the stock markets over the long term is that top line revenue, sales. that's what we node to see. that is what --. melissa: lance, i know that, tell me how do i protect my wealth in light of that? i hear what you're saying but you're reiterating what the guys before you said. we already agree with that. how do i protect my money? >> i know. the point is we're telling you the strength of the economy the economy is getting a lot weaker here. all recent data shows it. it means cash and fixed income will perform better most likely over next six to nine months while we go through this process. melissa: cash, cash is going to perform better?. >> c
, and what we is not in the right step relating to where they think the economy is in relation to the equity markets, so we're a little cautious here. we think if we are above the 1561 to close is above, and interimmediate bull line, we'll be all right. liz: yesterday, we saw volatility in the wake of the marathon bombings jump 43%. that was a little destabilize due to a drop in gold, a precipitous drop yesterday, but, today, it is pulling back by 2 #%. there on the floor of the cme, what are traders talking about as it relates to what happened yesterday versus today in >> yesterday was unusual. before we came in, as you stated, it started with china, and the market was down for fears of growth in china. the boston bombing increased it. as we go on, hear more about what's going on, it's not looking like it's a coordinated attack, nothing to spread to the rest of the country. that's begin us time to di jeers everything and look at what we have to, and that's economic data that's going to drive what the market is ultimately. the other things have effects, no doubt, and they vie ma more in the
of our time to chinese investors and really an international economy but we are looking at not just across the country but to invest and -- in the bay area and it's not goal of -- 50% there and to ed we are a region and many of these companys are going to be make this horizontal and vertical -- chinese investors in the entire bay area and so they have to have it's a different game. and you know, texans have to live there. the reality is that this is one of the most beautiful places with the best whrr and -- [inaudible] company that is going to for tech assistance on your software and you get somebody in india well they are actually -- because oakland they are putting a call center in oakland to get a quicker turn around and -- in many languages and that is an innovation because of the diversity and depth of the talent in the bay area. >> prop 30 doesn't make economic development harder or is that an issue >>> well it may be a challenge for certain types of companies but i do think that our investments as mayor khan said increasing the quality of life here for the talented empl
the city is doing so well which is great, that's also a positive thing when the economy recovers. unfortunately one of the down sides of that our city becomes more expensive and that rent goes up. ~ and i think all of us have heard it from our tenants in our district. and i want to be really careful in saying that i think when people have attacked tic as an option, that we're not attacking the people who want to own homes in the city. we're just attacking the solution to home -- that solution to homeownership, that we would prefer that people who want to become homeowners, they didn't have to go to the rent controlled housing stock to become homeowners. we want to find another pathway. one of that of course is more housing production, but also housing production that is affordable to residents in the city. and i am guilty of that, as many of our colleagues are of supporting, you know, luxury developments in the city that doesn't address that concern. but i think that we have to figure out really a more realistic solution in terms of what homeownership means that's affordable to o
. >> the competition is spreading, but that's unlikely to discourage companies from expanding in this economy. >>> a "new york times" reporter in china has won journalism's highest honor. david barboza was awarded the pull lit -- pulitzer prize for exposing the hidden wealth of the family of china's former premier. new york's columbia university announced the winners of the award on monday. the pulitzer also covers literature, drama and music. barboza reported that relatives of then-premier wen jiabao had secretly amassed billions of bars. the judges praised his exposure of corruption. they noted he published his work despite heavy pressure from chinese officials. wen's family denied the report. the chinese government also criticized it. "the new york times" also won a pulitzer or reporting on the practices of apple and other technology companies. judges praised the "times" for exposing excessive working hours and other harsh conditions at contract manufacturers in china and elsewhere. >>> aung san suu kyi's first visit to japan in 27 years has been an emotional experience for many. that's es
, understand your business, talk to them as you are growing your business. when the economy is strong, all lenders are shopping for transactions. in times are tough on credit, you want to rely on those deeper liberation ships with your lender. you want to develop a relationship with a lender. it is the case where you want to open up an account, while to have another bank services that you want to have a relationship with your lender with it because when you go to them for any loan requests, you want them to know about your business and feel like they are a partner of yours, not just that you are shopping them. if you are shopping, you are just looking for the best deal from them, rather than a long- term relationship. >> i want to thank everyone for coming. hopefully, you have all signed up for our updates. we are going to be hosting these on a regular basis. the next two coming up will focus on becoming a government contractor, how your small business can partner with the government. the next one will also be on how to grain your business, with tax -- green your business, tax credits ava
companies from investing in this rapidly expanding economy. nhk world. >>> all right. now let's take a look at the market figures. >>> when people read these day, they often turn to electron eck devices. one man in the state of wisconsin is encouraging readers to pick up paper books again. anyone can borrow a book for free provided that they leave one in return. the idea has taken off. nhk has his story. >> reporter: small is beautiful when it comes to reading in america these days. miniature bookshelves like these are popping up on roadsides or in coffee shops across the united states. called little free libraries. they're changing the reading habits of local communities. the idea couldn't be simpler. you grab as many books as you like. and you don't have to bring them back. but you do have to row place them. the rule is, take a book, leave a book. that means the narrow shelves are always full and the stock is always changing. it was todd bowl who came up with the idea for the little free library. >> the first library i built in 2009. and this one has number one. >> reporter: he started th
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you.
.s. economy and the epeng crisis in europe. they cut china's growth to 8% from 8.2%. >> a slow down in gdp in china got the blame. but ford does not see it that way, they are protecting that 40% of the sale s will come fro china. they have doubled their capacity, scrambling to keep up with demand to keep up with the market. we have a closer look at fd's rapid expansion there and the challenges it faces. >> he is part of the new wave in china. car buyers turning the western part of the country into one of the hottest auto markets in the world. >> translator: in his mind, he feels that the car, the brand is good. and the service is also excellent. so this is why he trusts this brand. >> here, the gateway to western china, growth in auto sales is particularly good news for ford. at this plant, a new focus roles off the assembly line every minute and within two years ford will be doubling capacity in the area. >> this year, the total volume of the ford, were 600,000. so it's a big, big key. >> growing sales in china have been one of the top goals since he took over ford in 2006. at the time, f
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